So we don't get left behind: Indigenous Women in front of the SDGs

Peru is marked by inequalities that have condemned generations to survive in precarious conditions and deprivation. The great promise of “inclusion” has not led to social progress. However, a period of several years of economic boom created the fantasy of Peru becoming a middle-income country and thus, in a position to join the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). From 2014 onwards, an economic slowdown began to be felt and reduced revenue was collected for the national treasury.

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Poverty measurement, social programmes and Amazonian indigenous peoples: A Peruvian case study with the Wampis people

“... since 2008, the people have been living in great fear that social and vaccination programmes and laws are aimed at destroying the indigenous peoples [of Peru].”

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THE WAYS OF LIVING WELL 1: HEALING - by FEDIQUEP and PUINAMUDT in Peru

Aurelio Chino Dahua, President of FEDIQUEP [1]

Mario Zúñiga Lossio, Anthropologist of PUINAMUDT [2]

Originally published at: https://observatoriopetrolero.org/los-caminos-del-vivir-bien-1-la-sanacion/

INTRODUCTION

These times of epidemic, dreams have not stopped, perhaps, some have been postponed, but they are there. This is the case of the traditional medicinal center for the Inka people of Pastaza.

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The right to citizenship: Challenges for forest indigenous peoples in Cameroon

On the 70th Anniversary of the International Declaration on Human Rights, the Gbabandi platform launched a Declaration and Report (french only) on access to citizenship for the indigenous forest peoples in Cameroon. Over 50 representatives from indigenous communities, Cameroonian civil society and the Government have come together in Yaoundé for this launch, which is part of a national dialogue on the rights of indigenous forest peoples and access to citizenship. 

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Supported by the European Union

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