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Poverty measurement, social programmes and Amazonian indigenous peoples: A Peruvian case study with the Wampis people

“... since 2008, the people have been living in great fear that social and vaccination programmes and laws are aimed at destroying the indigenous peoples [of Peru].”

- COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO THE INDIGENOUS NAVIGATOR SURVEY, QUESTION # 56.

Since 2016, the Wampis women have been demanding that the Ministry of Development and Social Inclusion (MIDIS) make changes to its social programmes to ensure they are geographically and culturally appropriate1 and to enable the women themselves to conduct quality assessments of the State’s education and health services in the communities. The following text has been written thanks to their participation, on the basis of their responses to the Indigenous Navigator community survey issued in 2015 and their various complaints raised in different training and meeting spaces.

In the context of the Indigenous Navigator’s community survey, the answer given to question number 56 on whether there had been cases of deprivation of life or threats to individuals or groups since 2008 was particularly noteworthy: “No. But since 2008 the people have been living in great fear that social and vaccination programmes and [National] laws are aimed at destroying the indigenous peoples.”

This issue also falls within the scope of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as the social programmes are aimed at reducing the intergenerational transmission of poverty and improving the education, health and nutrition of vulnerable children. Since publication of the SDGs, different international organisations have clarified that they need to be interpreted in the light of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples when related to indigenous peoples.2 The Declaration is clear that State-run development programmes must be drawn up and decided with indigenous peoples’ involvement,3 a condition that is not met by the social programmes currently being implemented in Peru’s indigenous territories, and something that could have avoided many of these programmes’ negative impacts thus far. In addition, when considering indigenous peoples specifically, SDG No. 1 on poverty reduction must be understood and guaranteed through a culturally-appropriate approach, in cooperation with the indigenous peoples involved.

Read the full report >> Poverty measurement, social programmes and Amazonian indigenous peoples: a Peruvian case study with the Wampis people 

Author: Yaizha Campanario Baqué
Publisher: Centre for Public Policy and Human Rights – Perú Equidad together with IWGIA under the Indigenous Navigator

Cover & report photographs: Pablo Lasansky / Wampis Territorial Autonomous Government, Peru

1. Servindi: Cuestionan interculturalidad de “Juntos” en dos cuencas amazónicas: https://www.servindi.org/actualidad-noticias/03/05/2016/cuestionan-interculturalidad-de-juntos-en-dos-cuencas-amazonicas 

2. United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues: Los pueblos indígenas y la Agenda 2030. https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2016/08/Spanish-Backgrounder-SDGs_FINAL.pdf

3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Art.23: In particular, indigenous peoples have the right to be actively involved in developing and determining health, housing and other economic and social programmes affecting them and, as far as possible, to administer such programmes through their own institutions.

This case study has been produced with support from the European Union, under the project “Making the SDGs work for Indigenous Peoples - Promoting indigenous peoples’ human development and social inclusion in the context of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” (GLO / 16/23 / EUR), which forms part of the Indigenous Navigator Initiative supported by the European Union.

All statements of fact, analysis or opinion in this case study are the author’s and the Centre for Public Policy and Human Rights – Perú Equidad’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the official positions or views of the European Union.

 

Supported by the European Union

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The Indigenous Navigator provides a set of tools for indigenous peoples to systematically monitor the level of recognition and implementation of their rights.

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